>What Real People Wore- Ready for their Close Up

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Here’s some vintage German photos of some close ups and a studio shot.  These are great for hair and makeup inspiration, and it’s also somewhat nice, in my opinion, to see that not everyone was as glamorous as the Hollywood stars or Vogue models.
Strange to think that these may be someone’s grandma (or great grandma), and the photos have passed hand so that they’re now here for us to all see on the internet, and admire their style.
These two ladies look like their photos were probably taken in the late 1930s.  Sometimes it is hard for me to date old photographs, especially European ones, as their fashion was a little different in aesthetic than their American counterparts.  And check out those ringlets on the girl on the right!  I would wager her dress is a home made creation.
Old photos can be quite hard to gauge because women did often wear their clothes for years, and especially older women didn’t bother keeping up with fads, hemlines, and other little changes that distinguish one year’s (or decade’s) look from another’s.  The ladies above look like their photographs could be from the 1930s, but the lady on the left could possibly be as late as the 1950s. The lady on the right reminds me of secret sleuth for some reason-  kind of Miss Marple-esque- and I wouldn’t be in the least surprised if some of her ensemble was carried over from the 1910s or 1920s.  Perhaps the coat and chain?
Keeping up with the Victorian/Edwardian theme I’ve been dabbling in- doesn’t this lady’s hair and even jabot give her a somewhat 1870s style?  But the photo above was taken in 1968.  I don’t know German, but if you do I’d love to hear what you think it says.
Hope you’re having a great weekend!
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3 thoughts on “>What Real People Wore- Ready for their Close Up”

  1. Here is a rough translation of the back of the photo:

    Don’t leave me alone for so long! Waiting for you and very lonely, Erta. When you are sad and very alone, then take me in your hand. I will always be with my beloved Siggi(?).

    1. Siggi makes complete sense – it’s short for Siegfried, or Sigismund, or some other German name like that.

      These photos are fantastic! I love the first one – she is almost glamorous. ;)

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